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Edmonton Film Prize Winners!


The winners of the third annual Edmonton Film Prize were announced at a networking reception January 12 at MacEwan University in Edmonton. The Film Prize was presented alongside the Edmonton Music Prize, awarded by Alberta Music. Both prizes are sponsored by the City of Edmonton, through the Edmonton Arts Council. The Edmonton Film Prize is administered by the Alberta Media Production Industries Association (AMPIA).

The Edmonton Film Prize consists of three prizes – an $8,000 ‘Grand Prize’ and two ‘Runner Up’ prizes of $1000 each. The three awards are intended to recognize Edmonton-based filmmakers who demonstrate artistic and technical excellence. Entries are judged by an independent jury of filmmakers and members of the film community.

The Winners:

Grand Prize Winner: The Great Human Odyssey (Niobe Thompson) is a journey of discovery in the footsteps of our human ancestors. Niobe Thompson unlocks the mystery of our unlikely survival and miraculous emergence as the world’s only global species.  Anthropologist and double-Gemini winning filmmaker Niobe Thompson has a PhD from Cambridge University’s Scott Polar Research Institute and co-founded Clearwater Documentary in 2008. The Great Human Odyssey features a live symphonic and choral score by Edmonton-born Daren Fung, recorded with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra.

First Runner Up: 2.57k (Eva Colmers) This unique short film arose from the intense collaboration process with two remarkable Edmonton artists – sand-sound installation artist Gary James Joynes and DOP/editor aAron Munson. Following two bold dancers, the film is a daring, sensual and visually astonishing depiction of life’s eternal patterns of attraction and repulsion.

Second Runner up: The Little Deputy (Trevor Anderson) The film is a hybrid documentary-Western that debuted at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. In the film, director/writer Trevor Anderson recreates a photo shoot he did with his Dad at West Edmonton Mall as a child. The recreation brings fantasy to life.